Liverpool's centre for the contemporary arts

Who's blogging?

Latest post

Opinion: The controversy of Genesis

published by The Bluecoat

Jacob Epstein's Genesis has returned to Bluecoat for the first time in 86 years, as part of the exhibition In the Peaceful Dome. ...

Topics
Search

Book Tickets

Tickets & Information

0151 702 5324 | info@thebluecoat.org.uk

Support Us

Become a member

Individual | Corporate

For more information about how you can support the Bluecoat please visit the support us section

Stay up to date

Public View artists at Bluecoat: Then & Now

Then and Now

As Bluecoat celebrates its 300th anniversary with Public View, an exhibition showcasing over 100 artists who have previously exhibited at the arts centre, Artistic Director Bryan Biggs discusses the work of some of the returning artists.

Public View will be on display at Bluecoat until Sun 23 Apr

Artist: Tom Wood


Then

This photograph was included in All Zones Off Peak, the artist’s solo show staged at both Bluecoat and Open Eye Gallery in 1998, the culmination of years photographing life on Merseyside’s buses - a sort of Homeric journey through the region. Tom also exhibited at Bluecoat in In a New Light: Merseyside Photographers, 1990; Walk On, curated by Bluecoat for the 2006 Shanghai Biennale; and 3 am: wonder, paranoia and the restless night, 2013.   

Tom Wood, Virginia Road, New Brighton, 1984. Photograph. Courtesy of the artist 

Now

In Public View, Tom is showing another photograph from the All Zones Off Peak series. It’s a fantastic picture, compositionally and in terms of its subject matter - a crowd struggling, some of them frantically, to get on a bus pulling into the stop at New Brighton.  


 

Artists: Peter Saville and Malcolm Garrett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then

Peter Saville and Malcolm Garrett exhibited record sleeves and posters at Bluecoat in 1981 in Cover Versions, arguably the first ever exhibition of graphics that followed in the wake of punk. It featured seminal designers like Barney Bubbles (Elvis Costello, the Damned) and Chris Morton (Stiff Records), as well as two who’d graduated from Manchester Art College, Malcolm - who created a distinctive look for fellow Mancunians, Buzzcocks - and Peter whose stylish designs were an integral part of the look of Factory Records and of popular Wirral electro outfit Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark.

Now

Included in the exhibition is a later, limited edition print of a poster first shown in Cover Versions, which Peter designed for Factory Records’ first event (hence its number, FAC1). Malcolm Garrett is represented by four original, late-1970s screen printed Buzzcocks posters.

FAC1 Poster, 2003. Copyright the Artist, courtesy Paul Stolper Gallery


 

Artist: Jeremy Deller

Then

Acid Brass was commissioned by Bluecoat from future Turner-Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller in 1997, part of live art series Mixing It, which looked at popular music in relation to the coming of the CD, remix culture and the supposed ‘death of vinyl’. Jeremy ingeniously brought two popular music forms – acid house and Northern brass bands – together, working with the Williams Fairey Brass Band, the best in the country, to score, then play, a night of stomping house anthems, including ‘Voodoo Ray’, ‘Let’s Get Brutal’ and ‘Pacific 808’. We presented the work at LIPA, the evening compered by Tony Wilson, who provided a potted history of house.

Now

This print is based on Jeremy’s diagram for Acid Brass, created after this Bluecoat commission was premiered in Liverpool. It sets out the connections between acid house music and brass bands, their shared roots in DIY, predominantly working class culture, and the political context of this period – the rise of ‘Thatcher’s Britain’ - that saw the Miners’ Strike, the decline of old heavy industries particularly in the North of England, illegal raves and house music’s transatlantic origins.   

History of the World, 1998. Silkscreen print on Somerset velvet 280gsm. Copyright the Artist, courtesy Paul Stolper Gallery


 

Artist: Mark Leckey

Then

Mark Leckey exhibited at Bluecoat in 2013 with a beautifully curated show, The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things, which was commissioned as part of the Hayward Touring national programme. Premiering at Bluecoat, it included a dizzying array of art works and museum objects that spoke to each other across time – William Blake’s death mask, an animatronic hand, an ancient religious relic, Richard Hamilton’s computer and Mark Leckey’s own drum machine.  He also included a giant inflatable Felix the Cat that later was shown at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool.

 

 

 

Now

In the exhibition, Mark has included a video proposal for The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things exhibition, which gives a sense of the creative process and thinking behind the show.

Mark Leckey, Prp4aShw, 2010-2013. Video. Courtesy the artist


 

Artist: Nina Edge

Then

Nina Edge has exhibited at Bluecoat many times, as well as being commissioned for large scale, participatory performance projects including Sold Down the River. This went from Bluecoat to the Albert Dock in a gloriously celebratory and defiant procession that critiqued the way Merseyside was being abandoned by industries, vilified in the media and written off by central government.  Nina’s solo exhibition Virtual Duality in 1994 involved a large installation that featured security fencing and hundreds of old keys that people donated.

Now

For the current exhibition, Nina has revisited her 1994 installation in a vibrant new window vinyl that shows a cascade of keys. This is one of three works in the show that relate to Nina’s ongoing project at her home in Liverpool’s Welsh streets, where she has been campaigning - and winning – the battle to stop demolition of housing stock as part of a ‘renewal’ scheme. The windows of her house have become a site of resistance, articulation of the residents’ campaign, and public art gallery.

 

 

 


 

Artist: Lin Holland

Lin has exhibited many times at Bluecoat, first in group exhibition, Home Base, in 1987 when the main gallery was dominated by her elegant life sized female figures construcred from newspaper and string.  The image here shows the figures awating transport to Cologne, as part of Bluecoat’s first exhibiton exchange with Liverpool’s German twin city, when six local artists presented work there at the BBK Gallery. A youthful Lin and Bryan Biggs, Bluecoat’s gallery director, are in the courtyard with a representative of Fords, Halewood who supplieed the van to transport the exhibition.

Now

For Public View, Lin has remade one of the newspaper figures from her 1987 show, this time standing on two large TVs, on whose screens scrolls a roll call of significant women artists from art history. Positioned in the upstairs gallery, the work is a dramatic centrepiece to the room and a fitting end point to the exhibition, resonating as it does with Bluecoat’s long engagement with women artists as well as with Merseyside-based artists. 

Tags:Exhibitions

Related posts you may like

Comments

Be the first to leave a comment below...

Leave a comment

Welcome, Guest. Please or to have your say.

About the Bluecoat

Liverpool’s centre for the contemporary arts, Bluecoat showcases talent across visual art, music, dance, live art and literature. As the most ...

Opening hours

Mon - Sat 9.00am - 6.00pm
Sun 11.00am - 6.00pm

Tickets & Information

0151 702 5324 | info@thebluecoat.org.uk

Who's blogging?

Opinion: The controversy of Genesis

published by The Bluecoat

Tweets from @theBluecoat

Feedback

Please use this form to tell us about your experience of our website.

There was an error with your details, please try entering them again.

Stay up to date

Subscribe to the Bluecoat free mailing list and we'll send you all the details of our new events

Log In

There was an error with your details, please try entering them again.